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  • A MAGNIFICENT CORNER CABINET BY JAMES HICKS - REF No. 4040
  • A MAGNIFICENT CORNER CABINET BY JAMES HICKS - REF No. 4040
  • A MAGNIFICENT CORNER CABINET BY JAMES HICKS - REF No. 4040
  • A MAGNIFICENT CORNER CABINET BY JAMES HICKS - REF No. 4040
  • A MAGNIFICENT CORNER CABINET BY JAMES HICKS - REF No. 4040

A MAGNIFICENT CORNER CABINET BY JAMES HICKS - REF No. 4040

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Product Details

H: 35 in / 88.9 cm ; W: 25 1/2 in / 64.8 cm ; D:  17 3/4 in / 45.5 cm 

An exceptional 19th century cabinet by James Hicks of Dublin in the style of William Moore.

Circa 1890

Irish

Biography:

James HICKS (1886 - 1936), a cabinetmaker, was extremely skilled at producing furniture in 18th-century styles. He trained in the cabinet making workshops on Tottenham Court Road in London. On his return set up business in 1893 at 5 Lower Pembroke Street, Dublin. He established what was to become one of Dublin’s leading cabinet making firms with a client list that included Princess Victoria, the Crown Princess of Sweden, and King Edward VII making fine veneered and inlaid furniture usually to commission.

 

William Moore:

Whilst associated with Ireland, William Moore (d.1815) was a London cabinet maker who served his apprenticeship with the celebrated London firm of Ince and Mayhew where he specialized as a 'marqueteur.' Moore's apprenticeship with Ince and Mayhew provided him not only with the finest skill as a cabinetmaker and marquetry specialist but also with an education in contemporary taste and design that enabled him to set up on his own in 1782. Keen to open his own firm and with the high end of the London market saturated with firms such as Thomas Chippendale, John Cobb, John Linnell and of course, Ince and Mayhew, Moore opted to move to Dublin. This proved to be well timed and profitable due to the birth of Dublin's Georgian New Town and the massive increase in demand for fashionable cabinet makers. Moore's first known premises were in Abbey Street, 1785-90 and subsequently larger premises in Capel Street, where he remained until his death in 1815.

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